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Jeff’s Schedule for April 30 – May 5, 2018

Well, Spring seems to have taken hold of Piedmont NC. Everything is lush and green and there is a lot to do. As a recovering perfectionist, I can tell you that stressing out over what you don’t get to will only drain your energy. Make sure that you see what you accomplished every day, including what happens in the garden. If you didn’t get to a particular task, appreciate the abundance of the garden and landscape. So much beauty occurs with no assistance from humans. Taking this approach to your gardening helps you enjoy your garden more, or at least, to appreciate it more. And that’s the key to becoming a successful gardener!

This week’s tip

I’ll start this week’s tip section with a couple of shameless plugs for my classes, since they tie in nicely with the information. I’ll be teaching “Organic Gardening 101” at Renfrow Farm on May 8, starting at 630PM. It’s a primer on organic gardening techniques and philosophy. You can sign up here. Beginning on May 15 is “Sustainable Agriculture 102” at Lomax Farm in Concord, NC. This is a series of classes based on organic principles. You can join us even if you didn’t take 101. It’s a hands on course that will definitely get you grounded in organics. Here’s more info.
Now, this week’s tip. Remember that I wrote last week that organic gardening is all about creating. Creating healthy soil, creating habitat for beneficial insects, and creating plant diversity. Beneficial insects help us in so many ways. As pollinators, they help us grow our food. Predators consume many of the pest insects that we struggle to manage. Parasite insects help with insect control as well. You can attract and support all of these critters by doing things that are beneficial to the garden anyway.
Herbs and flowers provide shelter and food for beneficial insects. Bunch grasses, preferably ornamental grasses, provide shelter for beetles that eat stink bugs and other pests. “Chunky” wood chip or bark mulches give beetles a place to hunt the juvenile stink bugs that live in the mulch. It’s quite simple, really. Plant more herbs, grow daisies and yarrow, add a couple of grasses, and mulch the garden with old wood chips or bark. If you want more details on any of these approaches, come to one of my classes, or schedule a consultation at your home. Here’s how to do that.

Here’s where I’ll be this week.

Monday April 30, I’m in Matthews, working on my business, as opposed to in my business.

Tuesday, May 1, Renfrow Farm and environs
After another rainy spell, I’ve got some catching up to do. If you miss me at the farm, contact me here

Wednesday, May 2, On the road

Thursday, May 3, 2018 Farm Business Management Central Carolina Community College, Pittsboro, NC **This is a curriculum course and registration is closed for the semester. I teach Farm Business Management at CCCC, based on my work, Cash Crop: Cultivating Profit In Your Farm or Food Business. You can cultivate profit in the same way you cultivate your crops. Good planning helps you work ON your business as much as you work IN your business. Creating and analyzing enterprise and whole farm budgets cultivate the farm’s operation in order to grow your farm’s profits.
This class can be offered at your community college, too. Contact me to find out how.

Thursday, May 3, 2018 6:00-9:00PM Sustainable Agriculture 101
Elma C. Lomax Incubator Farm, Atando Road, Concord, NC Registration is now CLOSED. Sustainable Ag 102, Field & Greenhouse Management, begins May 17. More info here.
Demand for sustainable or organically grown products continues to increase. USDA Certified Organic produce is in short supply at all major grocery stores. Opportunities abound IF you can produce a quality product, grow in sufficient quantities, and know the proper marketing channels. I’ve been teaching farmers to cultivate profit since 1996. Come join us at the Lomax Farm to learn how to grow good food in a certified organic farm. We’re going to be on a working farm, so dress appropriately. That includes dressing for wet, cold weather.

Friday, May 4, I’m available for home and Farm consultations. Contact me here.

Saturday, May 5, 2018 9AM-2PM, In the Greenhouse at Renfrow’s!
Renfrow Hardware, 188 North Trade Street, Matthews, NC
More info here.
Come see me for all your gardening needs, from fresh transplants, great products for the garden, or the best selection of seeds in the Charlotte region! Got a problem? Bring it to us. Need to understand a soil test recommendation? We’ll interpret it for you. Come see us!

How can I help you?

Spring is a great time to take stock of what’s going on in the garden and landscape. As new growth sprouts all over, new ideas do, too. But you may not know if they will work. That’s where I come in. I’ve designed and installed all kinds of landscapes, from formal herb gardens to Permaculture homesteads. In an hour, I can solve problems, identify plants, show you some opportunities, and help you enjoy your garden even more! If you’re interested in a home landscape consultation, contact me here.

I farmed and operated a plant nursery in NC for 15 years, and was an NC Cooperative Extension agent for 8 years. In that time, I learned a LOT about farm production and farm business management. I can help you with organic certification, transition to organic practices, and marketing your farm and food products. To learn how to cultivate profit on your farm, contact me here

In these times of great opportunity for small business owners, strategic planning is essential for success. I can help you write a business plan, construct enterprise and cash flow budgets, and do market research. Individual consultations and group trainings are options for getting the information you need to succeed! To take advantage of the opportunities that are available to small business owners, contact me here.

Remember to enjoy your garden, because THAT’S what makes you a Successful Gardener! Hope to see you sometime this week!

Peace, Grace, & Love,
Jeff

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Jeff’s Schedule for April 23-28, 2018

We’re still in an unsettled weather pattern, but we seem to have enough good weather to get some gardening tasks done. Last week, there was a chance of frost in Piedmont NC, but I don’t think we had any in the Charlotte area. We’ve also had some very warm days, sunny enough for that early Spring sunburn. Oh, well…That’s Springtime in North Carolina!

This week’s tip.

Do you know what the word “organic” means when it comes to gardening? Most folks define it in limiting terms, by what you don’t do. “You don’t use pesticides or fertilizer.” That’s not true by the way. More on that later. I haven’t found a definition that I like, so let’s move on…
Organic gardening is all about creating. Creating healthy soil, creating habitats for beneficial insects, and creating a diverse plant population. All this creativity provides an environment where plants and people can thrive. I’ll be teaching “Organic Gardening 101” at Renfrow Farm on May 8, 2018. I’ll teach you how to create a great garden of your own!
Organic gardeners know that any garden begins with the soil. In most of Piedmont NC, we have some type of clay soil. These soils are usually low in organic matter, that dark brown stuff that everybody mistaken calls soil. It’s certainly a big part of a healthy soil, but it’s not the only part. Clay is actually a good soil to grow in, as it tends to retain nutrients and water. It’s just difficult to work with because it compacts so easily. To solve that challenge, we have several practices available to us.
Compost is the solution most people choose. Making your own compost is easy, and we have plenty of things to compost. It’s also a post for another day. You can buy plenty of good compost these days, in bag or bulk form. Just add about 2” of compost each time you plant, along with a mulch of organic material, to begin to create a rich soil, full of microbial life that benefits all the plants in a garden.
Mulches are organic materials used to build soil slowly, keeping weeds reduced and moisture in the soil. Applying 2” of mulch every year gives the plants new organic matter the same way Nature does, slowly and from the soil surface down. Shredded leaves and wheat straw are the most often used mulches in the garden. FYI, plastics are often used by organic gardeners, but only as a temporary measure. They don’t build soil, and can often slow the process down. They also add a LOT of waste to the landfill.
Cover crops and “green manures” are plants that you grow in order to build soil. The roots grow down, loosening the soil. The roots of “Green manures” are on plants that convert Nitrogen from the atmosphere to a form plants can use. When you mow and/or till the soil, the plant foliage rots down to add more food for the microbes in the soil. Some cover crops include clovers, vetch, annual grasses, buckwheat, and most any of the peas and beans.
Doing any, and preferably all, of these things provides a rich environment for all of the microbes and other critters that live in the soil. This living soil provides all of the things plants need in order to feed themselves.

Here’s where I’ll be this week.

Monday April 23, I’m in Matthews, working on my business, as opposed to in my business. You have to do both to run a business.

Tuesday, April 24, Renfrow Farm and environs
The weather forecast isn’t looking good, so I may or may not be around the farm. If you need me, contact me here.

Wednesday, April 26 On the road

Thursday, April 25, 2018 Farm Business Management Central Carolina Community College, Pittsboro, NC **This is a curriculum course and registration is closed for the semester. I teach Farm Business Management at CCCC, based on my work, Cash Crop: Cultivating Profit In Your Farm or Food Business. You can cultivate profit in the same way you cultivate your crops. Good planning helps you work ON your business as much as you work IN your business. Creating and analyzing enterprise and whole farm budgets cultivate the farm’s operation in order to grow your farm’s profits.
This class can be offered at your community college, too. Contact me to find out how.

Thursday, April 25, 2018 6:00-9:00PM Sustainable Agriculture 101
Elma C. Lomax Incubator Farm, Atando Road, Concord, NC Registration is now CLOSED. Sustainable Ag 102, Field & Greenhouse Management, begins May 17. You can register NOW!
Demand for sustainable or organically grown products continues to increase. USDA Certified Organic produce is in short supply at all major grocery stores. Opportunities abound IF you can produce a quality product, grow in sufficient quantities, and know the proper marketing channels. I’ve been teaching farmers to cultivate profit since 1996. Come join us at the Lomax Farm to learn how to grow good food in a certified organic farm. We’re going to be on a working farm, so dress appropriately. That includes dressing for wet, cold weather.

Friday, I’m available for home and Farm consultations. Contact me here.

Saturday, April 28, 2018 9AM-2PM, In the Greenhouse at Renfrow’s!
Renfrow Hardware, 188 North Trade Street, Matthews, NC
More info here.
Come see me for all your gardening needs, from fresh transplants, great products for the garden, or the best selection of seeds in the Charlotte region! Got a problem? Bring it to us. Need to understand a soil test recommendation? We’ll interpret it for you. Come see us!

How can I help you?

Spring is a great time to take stock of what’s going on in the garden and landscape. As new growth sprouts all over, new ideas do, too. But you may not know if they will work. That’s where I come in. I’ve designed and installed all kinds of landscapes, from formal herb gardens to Permaculture homesteads. In an hour, I can solve problems, identify plants, show you some opportunities, and help you enjoy your garden even more! If you’re interested in a home landscape consultation, contact me here.

I farmed and operated a plant nursery in NC for 15 years, and was an NC Cooperative Extension agent for 8 years. In that time, I learned a LOT about farm production and farm business management. I can help you with organic certification, transition to organic practices, and marketing your farm and food products. To learn how to cultivate profit on your farm, contact me here.

In these times of great opportunity for small business owners, strategic planning is essential for success. I can help you write a business plan, construct enterprise and cash flow budgets, and do market research. Individual consultations and group trainings are options for getting the information you need to succeed! To take advantage of the opportunities that are available to small business owners, contact me here.

Remember to enjoy your garden, because THAT’S what makes you a Successful Gardener! Hope to see you sometime this week!

Peace, Grace, & Love,
Jeff

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Jeff’s Schedule for April 16-21, 2018

As I write this, heavy rains and high winds are hammering the Virginia Mountains. We just got power back after a five hour blackout (Thanks to the linemen who did the repairs!). Spring continues in its unsettled manner.

This week’s tip

“Should I replant?” I’ve been asked that question a lot lately, and as with so many questions, the answer begins with “It depends.” So here’s a brief run-down on how to make that decision.
If the plant was only slightly damaged, but not killed, by cold, just be patient. It certainly might grow out of it as the weather warms. If most of the leaves are undamaged, wait a week and see what the new growth looks like. If over half of the plant is damaged, it will probably still be OK. We just won’t want to wait for it to recover. Any more than that, and I’d send it to the compost pile.
Insect and disease damaged plants have a little different set of thresholds. You can tolerate a lot of insect damage if you simply want food to eat. I’ve eaten many a delicious apple using a pocket knife to cut out all the imperfections. I’ve eaten half a tomato, cutting out damage from feeding pests, though I seldom eat a tomato with any disease symptoms ( not on purpose, anyway). The point is, what are you looking for from your food garden? Perfect looking food, or healthy, fresh food? Healthy plants produce healthy food. Healthy plants come from healthy soil. Good health seldom has anything to do with perfection. And in the garden, perfect appearance too often comes at the cost of heavy pesticide applications.
Poor seed germination happens to every gardener from time to time. The reasons would fill another article, but suffice it to say that timing is the solution here. In other words, did the crop failure happen early enough in the plant’s growing season that you have time for a re-planted crop to grow? If you do, go for it. If not, plant something else.
If you lose a vegetable crop to a disease (and that can happen), should you re-plant in the same spot? I wouldn’t recommend it, especially if it’s a soil-born disease. And I wouldn’t use that space for that crop for at least 2 years. You can always plant something else there. For instance, if you have disease problems with your tomatoes, plant beans or peas or squash there for the next few years. At the very least, move your tomato plants to the other end of your only raised bed, swapping ends each season. That’s not an ideal solution, but it helps.
Those are the most common reasons for re-planting. If you have a different situation, ask about it in the comments section.

Here’s where I’ll be this week.

Monday, I’m on the road.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 630-830 PM
The Successful Gardener: Soup & Salad Gardens.
Renfrow Farm, 409 W. Charles St., Matthews, NC
One of the easiest ways to eat seasonally is to create lots of soups and salads from the fresh vegetables you grow. But not every vegetable that you use in a particular recipe is available year round. We’ll look at garden plans, soup & salad recipes, and planting guides to learn how to lay out a tasty garden.
I’m expecting this class to sell out, so register soon!

Thursday, April 18, 2018
Farm Business Management
Central Carolina Community College, Pittsboro, NC
**This is a curriculum course and registration is closed for the semester. I teach Farm Business Management at CCCC, based on my work, Cash Crop: Cultivating Profit In Your Farm or Food Business. You can cultivate profit in the same way you cultivate your crops. Good planning helps you work ON your business as much as you work IN your business. Creating and analyzing enterprise and whole farm budgets cultivate the farm’s operation in order to grow your farm’s profits.
This class can be offered at your community college, too. Contact me to find out how.

Thursday, April 18, 2018 6:00-9:00PM
Sustainable Agriculture 101
Elma C. Lomax Incubator Farm, Atando Road, Concord, NC Registration is now CLOSED for 101. BUT Sustainable Ag 102, Field & Greenhouse Management, begins May 17. Sign up now!
Demand for sustainable or organically grown products continues to increase. USDA Certified Organic produce is in short supply at all major grocery stores. Opportunities abound IF you can produce a quality product, grow in sufficient quantities, and know the proper marketing channels. I’ve been teaching farmers to cultivate profit since 1996. Come join us at the Lomax Farm to learn how to grow good food in a certified organic farm. We’re going to be on a working farm, so dress appropriately. That includes dressing for wet, cold weather.

Saturday, April 21, 2018 11AM-3PM
An Afternoon at Retreat: A Living History event.
House in the Horseshoe State Historic Site
More info here.
It’s 1811, and former governor Benjamin Williams is the successful owner of “House in the Horseshoe” and its surrounding property, which he has renamed “Retreat.” Come out and explore a very different side of the site’s history, when farming was a scientific venture and cotton reigned king. Demonstrations, activities, and lectures will take place throughout the day. This special event is free, and open to the public.

How can I help you?

Spring is a great time to take stock of what’s going on in the garden and landscape. As new growth sprouts all over, new ideas do, too. But you may not know if they will work. That’s where I come in. I’ve designed and installed all kinds of landscapes, from formal herb gardens to Permaculture homesteads. In an hour, I can solve problems, identify plants, show you some opportunities, and help you enjoy your garden even more! If you’re interested in a home landscape consultation, contact me here.

I farmed and operated a plant nursery in NC for 15 years, and was an NC Cooperative Extension agent for 8 years. In that time, I learned a LOT about farm production and farm business management. I can help you with organic certification, transition to organic practices, and marketing your farm and food products. To learn how to cultivate profit on your farm, contact me here.

In these times of great opportunity for small business owners, strategic planning is essential for success. I can help you write a business plan, construct enterprise and cash flow budgets, and do market research. Individual consultations and group trainings are options for getting the information you need to succeed! To take advantage of the opportunities that are available to small business owners, contact me here.

Remember to enjoy your garden, because THAT’S what makes you a Successful Gardener! Hope to see you sometime this week!

Peace, Grace, & Love,
Jeff

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Jeff’s Schedule for April 9-14, 2018

As I usually do, I’m starting the week in Virginia, and then traveling to Matthews. Weather forecasts for Piedmont NC are looking good, with temps warming up and rain holding off a bit. Should be a decent week for planting.

This week’s tip

We’re moving into the planting times for warm-season crops, like tomatoes, peppers, and snap beans, in Piedmont NC. I’d still be a little cautious yet. We could have some rough weather yet. I’m gonna try to put in a last planting of lettuce, maybe more radishes and carrots, too. I’ll wait at least a week before I start planting tomatoes unprotected. There are lots of good garden calendars out there, like this one and this one. I’ve used them both at some time or another.
If you want to plant some fruit trees, berries, or grape vines this Spring, you’d best get it done, and be prepared to water this summer. I don’t use a lot of amendments when planting fruit trees, just some organic mulch on the soil surface. Same with grape vines. Make sure your planting holes are as deep as the container is tall and as wide as the container’s width. Loosen the root ball, so the plant’s roots will spread faster. I like to water the newly planted trees a good bit, too. That gets the plants off to a good start.
I like to plant blueberries in raised beds, better called raised wide rows, and you can add compost to those beds to help raise them. And you want to mulch those plants, too. Just like the fruit trees, you want to loosen the roots of the berry plants when they are planted, and give them a nice drink of water. That gives the blueberries a good head start in the clay soils of the Piedmont.

Here’s where I’ll be this week.

Monday, I’m in Virginia, then headed south to Matthews.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018 Renfrow Farm and environs
In the Spring, there’s always lots to do on the farm, and this year is no exception. I have 2 projects I’m working on this year. One is The Successful Gardener display garden, where I demonstrate and test all the methods I teach. The second is a new project that I am developing. Based on the concepts of Permaculture, we will be developing a “food forest”, an area planted into trees, bushes, vines, perennials, and a few annual plants, all grown to provide food for a family or community. As you drive by the farm on Charles Street, keep on eye out for this new project.

Thursday, April 12, 2018 Farm Business Management Central Carolina Community College, Pittsboro, NC **This is a curriculum course and registration is closed for the semester. I teach Farm Business Management at CCCC, based on my work, Cash Crop: Cultivating Profit In Your Farm or Food Business. You can cultivate profit in the same way you cultivate your crops. Good planning helps you work ON your business as much as you work IN your business. Creating and analyzing enterprise and whole farm budgets cultivate the farm’s operation in order to grow your farm’s profits.
This class can be offered at your community college, too. Contact me to find out how.

Thursday, April 12, 2018 6:00-9:00PM Sustainable Agriculture 101
Elma C. Lomax Incubator Farm, Atando Road, Concord, NC Registration is now CLOSED. Sustainable Ag 102, Field & Greenhouse Management, begins May 17.
Demand for sustainable or organically grown products continues to increase. USDA Certified Organic produce is in short supply at all major grocery stores. Opportunities abound IF you can produce a quality product, grow in sufficient quantities, and know the proper marketing channels. I’ve been teaching farmers to cultivate profit since 1996. Come join us at the Lomax Farm to learn how to grow good food in a certified organic farm. We’re going to be on a working farm, so dress appropriately. That includes dressing for wet, cold weather.

Saturday, April 14, 2018 9AM-2PM, In the Greenhouse at Renfrow’s!
Renfrow Hardware, 188 North Trade Street, Matthews, NC
More info here.
Come see me for all your gardening needs, from fresh transplants, great products for the garden, or the best selection of seeds in the Charlotte region! Got a problem? Bring it to us. Need to understand a soil test recommendation? We’ll interpret it for you. Come see us!

How can I help you?

Early Spring is a great time to take stock of what’s going on in the garden and landscape. As new growth sprouts all over, new ideas sprout, too. But you may not know if they will work. That’s where I come in. I’ve designed and installed all kinds of landscapes, from formal herb gardens to Permaculture homesteads. In an hour, I can solve problems, identify plants, show you some opportunities, and help you enjoy your garden even more! If you’re interested in a home landscape consultation, contact me here.

I farmed and operated a plant nursery in NC for 15 years, and was an NC Cooperative Extension agent for 8 years. In that time, I learned a LOT about farm production and farm business management. I can help you with organic certification, transition to organic practices, and marketing your farm and food products. To learn how to cultivate profit on your farm, contact me here.

In these times of great opportunity for small business owners, strategic planning is essential for success. I can help you write a business plan, construct enterprise and cash flow budgets, and do market research. Individual consultations and group trainings are options for getting the information you need to succeed! To take advantage of the opportunities that are available to small business owners, contact me here.

Remember to enjoy your garden, because THAT’S what makes you a Successful Gardener! Hope to see you sometime this week!

Peace, Grace, & Love,
Jeff

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Jeff’s Schedule for April 2-7, 2018

I’m starting this week in Virginia, taking care of some personal projects. I’ll be on the road a bit this week, as I so often am in the Spring. But you can always reach me through the website.

This week’s tip

With Spring finally here, I’m going to put our discussion of canning on hold for a bit. What everybody in Matthews is asking is, “Are we gonna have any more cold weather?” That’s a good question, and I have NO idea. The question is really about planting, so here’s my take. For gardeners thinking about tomatoes, peppers or sweet basil, I don’t see the need for any rush. The soil hasn’t warmed enough for good growth, so waiting a couple weeks won’t make that much difference. Any plants set out later, say, on 4/17 (this year’s Tax Day, and close to the average last frost in NC), will probably catch up to those planted now. Personally, I’d plant another round of lettuce, greens, carrots or radishes. In fact, that’s exactly what I did in The Successful Gardener display garden at Renfrow Farm last week.
If you just can’t wait any longer to plant tender vegetables, if it gets into the 40’s, you’ll need to protect your plants. An old sheet or a plant bed cover should do it. If you use plastic, keep it off the plants. Frost can burn a plant right through the plastic.
Another thing that helps is to acclimate your new plants to the unprotected space of the garden. Most bedding plants have spent their entire short lives in a greenhouse, first heated, then unheated. Hardening off, as this acclimation process is called, is simply leaving the new plants outdoors over a period of days, a little longer each day. Maybe an afternoon the first day, all day the next (weather permitting, of course), then into the evening. Eventually the plants will be fine left out over night. Then it’s much safer to plant them into the garden. BUT…frost tender plants like tomatoes, once planted in the garden, will still need to be protected from frost or cold wind. It’s just the nature of that plant.
In the long run, patience pays off in the garden. Hmmm…that’s a good lesson for Life, too!

Here’s where I’ll be this week.

Monday, I’m in Virginia, then headed south to Matthews.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018 Renfrow Farm and environs
In the Spring, there’s always lots to do on the farm, and this year is no exception. I have 2 projects I’m working on this year. One is The Successful Gardener display garden, where I demonstrate and test all the methods I teach. The second is a new project that I am developing. Based on the concepts of Permaculture, we will be developing a “food forest”, an area planted into trees, bushes, vines, perennials, and a few annual plants, all grown to provide food for a family or community. As you drive by the farm on Charles Street, keep on eye out for this new project.

Thursday, April 5, 2018 Farm Business Management Central Carolina Community College, Pittsboro, NC **This is a curriculum course and registration is closed for the semester. I teach Farm Business Management at CCCC, based on my work, Cash Crop: Cultivating Profit In Your Farm or Food Business. You can cultivate profit in the same way you cultivate your crops. Good planning helps you work ON your business as much as you work IN your business. Creating and analyzing enterprise and whole farm budgets cultivate the farm’s operation in order to grow your farm’s profits.
This class can be offered at your community college, too. Contact me to find out how.

Thursday, April 5, 2018 6:00-9:00PM Sustainable Agriculture 101
Elma C. Lomax Incubator Farm, Atando Road, Concord, NC Registration is now CLOSED. Sustainable Ag 102, Field & Greenhouse Management, begins May 17.
Demand for sustainable or organically grown products continues to increase. USDA Certified Organic produce is in short supply at all major grocery stores. Opportunities abound IF you can produce a quality product, grow in sufficient quantities, and know the proper marketing channels. I’ve been teaching farmers to cultivate profit since 1996. Come join us at the Lomax Farm to learn how to grow good food in a certified organic farm. We’re going to be on a working farm, so dress appropriately. That includes dressing for wet, cold weather.

Saturday, April 7, 2018 9AM-2PM, In the Greenhouse at Renfrow’s!
Renfrow Hardware, 188 North Trade Street, Matthews, NC
More info here.
Come see me for all your gardening needs, from fresh transplants, great products for the garden, or the best selection of seeds in the Charlotte region! Got a problem? Bring it to us. Need to understand a soil test recommendation? We’ll interpret it for you. Come see us!

How can I help you?

Spring is a great time to take stock of what’s going on in the garden and landscape. Last year’s growing season is behind you, and with leaves not out yet you can see the architecture of your landscape clearly. You can get a head start on Spring or finish up those Fall projects. I’ve designed and installed all kinds of landscapes, from formal herb gardens to Permaculture homesteads. In an hour, I can solve problems, identify plants, show you some opportunities, and help you enjoy your garden even more! If you’re interested in a home landscape consultation, contact me here.

I farmed and operated a plant nursery in NC for 15 years, and was an NC Cooperative Extension agent for 8 years. In that time, I learned a LOT about farm production and farm business management. I can help you with organic certification, transition to organic practices, and marketing your farm and food products. To learn how to cultivate profit on your farm, contact me here.

In these times of great opportunity for small business owners, strategic planning is essential for success. I can help you write a business plan, construct enterprise and cash flow budgets, and do market research. Individual consultations and group trainings are options for getting the information you need to succeed! To take advantage of the opportunities that are available to small business owners, contact me here.

Remember to enjoy your garden, because THAT’S what makes you a Successful Gardener! Hope to see you sometime this week!

Peace, Grace, & Love,
Jeff

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